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Tag Archives | southern garden history

Inspired by Past; Gardening for Today in Historic Spots

Living in historic homes means caring for, respecting the past.  But making the place work for today. It also can mean wresting with huge challenges of parts of the past we find appalling today.

Jenks discusses gardens he’s designed for today on site from Antebellum to Mid-Century Modern. Enjoy slides, stories of wresting with the past.

And get a peak at his new book, which describes modern life on his families 1750 era farmstead near Aiken SC.

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Snow Drop

The Earliest of Flower Gardens

There’s a patch of paper whites and snow drops in our pasture that’s older than I am. Just behind the little shed that’s been pony shed, goat shed and now donkey shed. Those are the kinds of bulbs I want in my gardens. From a practical stand point, because they come back, they thrive and… Read More

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Hay Bales to Flower Fields

How our little farm has transitioned over the decades.  And how that is a reflection of what people want in their own back yards….and what society wants and needs.

 

I know it sounds deep and boring. But really it will be a bunch of great stories including donkeys, grandmothers, interns and lessons about soil and flowers!

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Elephant Garlic; Buy it in the grocery store, plant it in the garden, eat it every year.

Trends in Foodscaping

“Over the past decades, our plant pallet changed in ways other than you might expect. Plant explorers and breeders bring new plants into nurseries. They, as well as garden designers, decorators and all sorts of cultural leaders, become the tastemakers, slowly changing which plants we can get hold of…..One slow, huge change, tracks our shift… Read More

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Passing On Deep Rooted Wisdom

Wisdom accumulates.  Self taught, old southern gardeners were my mentors who instilled fascination with the earth. They saw soil devistation and worked tirelessly to build the soil, forest and fields we have today.

I’ll tell stories of those people while looking at the good work and the missteps the made.

We’ll meet people who use plants, worms, mushroom and a little magic to grow beautiful soil — which means beautiful plants.   We’ll look at fun ways to build soil now; ways inspired by old gardeners but updated on our organic lily farm.

I’ve created internship programs in each botanical garden I established.  Recently, on our own lily farm.  This presentation is about sustainable, earth friendly gardening and passing on the responsibility and love of both.

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Regina's Disco Lounge

I Will Survive! Flowers for a Disco Queen

When a horticulturist (or anyone) comes up with a new plant, they get to name the plant.  Older, more genteel generations named plants to honor their wives or Alma-matter.  Think of Azalea ‘Mrs. G.G. Gerbing’ or ‘Clemson Spineless’ Okra. When I found a special crinum, I got my first chance at naming. Decades ago, I’d… Read More

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Kill the Confederate Myths: 5 Better Vines for Southern Shade

When we started building Riverbanks Botanical Garden, 20+ years ago, we had to deal with a Pennsylvanian’s idea of southern architecture. The building, walls and walkways of some grandiose vision of antebellum structures that only ever existed in bad movies.  It reminded me that, as a teen, I loved Aunti Mame as much as any… Read More

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